Controlled Remote Viewing

As an instructor of Remote Viewing, I've noticed that Activities taking place at a target site are often challenging for my students to describe well.

Why is that?  Why are activities seemingly more difficult to describe than, say, a building or a landscape?

It goes without saying that, regardless of what the target subject matter happens to be, new (and sometimes even seasoned viewers) are often tempted to name the target, rather than describe it.

Nouns are so handy, and our left-brained ability to name possible threats has kept us alive as a species.  So it is human nature to grab an assortment of perceptions and wrap them neatly into a package and slap a label on it.

But what about verbs?  Where do they fit into the remote viewing world?  A partial answer is: Verbs are often used to describe an activity.

Remote Viewers often find it challenging to describe activities.

Why? OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Verbs can often be as misleading as nouns.

Our mantra, "Describe, don't identify" applies here.

If a viewer says "The person is dancing," for example, the word "dancing" NAMES the activity, rather than describing it.  And the person might be fencing or doing a gymnastics routine -- not "dancing" at all!

So how would you describe that which you are perceive as "dancing"?  And how do you get yourself to stop using naming verbs and to instead describe the activity?

The answer lies in vocabulary-building.

Does the activity involve motion? If so, you can greatly improve your descriptive skills by amplifying your vocabulary with motion-related words.

Examples include directional words like spinning, rotating, moving from side to side, left to right, up and down.

Ask yourself, What is the quality of the motion? Is it slow? Vigorous? Frenetic? Jerky? Smooth? Graceful? Clumsy?

Are there specific body parts involved? For example, how would you describe a golfer, taking a swing?  "He is standing in a vertical orientation. His arms are moving in a swinging arc, from low to high, side to side. His hands are clasped together tightly. His legs are apart."

You get the idea.

So the next time you perceive that there is an activity at a target site, you can use this post as a guide to help you as you ask yourself questions designed to extract the best information possible about the motion taking place.

Enjoy your viewing!

 

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