Facing Your Fears

Facing Your Fears

by Lori Williams
© 2016 Lambert Williams Enterprises, LLC

Many times when we begin a remote viewing session, there is an initial sense of groundlessness, a sort of “lost” feeling. We always want to feel grounded, to know where we are in space/time, and even more importantly, where we are heading. That is a natural human instinct.

That instinct is what causes us to jump up and reach for something to eat, or something to watch on our phones, the minute we feel a bit uncomfortable, or the moment there is a lull in our lives that even hints at boredom.

CRV forces us to push through that ungrounded feeling and reach past the unknown in order to touch the target. It is like walking up to a huge stone cliff face and reaching our arm into an interesting-looking hole. At first, we don’t want to put our hand in there, much less push in all the way up to our armpit! What if there is a snake in there?!! Or what if something stings us?

But the possibility that hidden treasure was stored there many moons ago compels us to check it out, in spite of our fears.

Pema Chodron says in her essay, Not Causing Harm, “Underneath our ordinary lives, underneath all the talking we do, all the moving we do, all the thoughts in our minds, there is a fundamental groundlessness. It’s there bubbling along all the time. We experience it as restlessness and edginess. We experience it as fear. It motivates passion, aggression, ignorance, jealousy and pride, but we never get down to the essence of it.”

We all tend to want to “fill up space” in our lives. By not allowing those lulls, we avoid facing our fears and our discomforts.

Many forms of meditation are designed to help us learn to be at peace with every part of ourselves, to grow in compassion and love for ourselves, and to simply sit in silence and get to know ourselves.

CRV is almost a form of meditation, because through consistent practice, you learn about yourself – you see what you fear the most and it surprises you. You experience a tug-of-war between your conscious and subconscious minds until finally, one day, the struggle diminishes and a true friendship begins to form. You begin to realize that the goal of a practice CRV session isn’t about finding the truth about the target, but often it is about finding the truth about yourself.

Some of my students have discovered that they have phobias they never knew existed within them that they’ve now found cured through CRV. Others uncovered likes and dislikes that were previously ignored. We sometime find prejudices hiding within. And we stumble upon that which we truly love, but never realized how much.

Most people think of remote viewing as a very cool way to increase and control their inner intuitive abilities – and it is that. As they learn the techniques, they become very focused, almost obsessively, with “nailing the target” and/or “getting it right.”

But the true practice of CRV, using the structure and all the protocols, really does far more than that. CRV allows us to get to know ourselves. As we push past our self-imposed obstacles and learn our own symbologies, we get to know, love and accept ourselves in ways we never could have imagined. We form a partnership between conscious and subconscious minds.

Most of all, we learn how to calmly and courageously face the lulls and the dark and the unknown and the restlessness… in each CRV session… and in our lives.

 

 

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